White-Plumb Farm Learning Center

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, White-Plumb Farm Learning Center is a Colorado Centennial Farm— run by the same family for over 100 years before it was donated to the City of Greeley Museums! The property was settled in 1881 by Civil War Veteran Charles White as a turn of the century tree claim. During the last two years, the farm house on the property has undergone significant renovation and the outbuildings have been re-purposed for potential education programs.

The White-Plumb Farm Learning Center is an ideal location for private events such as weddings, baby showers, reunions, small group meetings, and educational classes. Request rental information online or by calling 970-350-9220.

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Historic Property Information

Congress enacted the Timber Culture Act of 1873, a follow up to the Homestead Act. Through the Timber Culture Act, homesteaders could qualify for an additional 160 acres of land if they planted at least 1/4th of the property with trees. By the time Charles A. White established his tree claim in 1881, only ten acres of trees were required to be planted. White planted ash and cottonwood trees bordering each side of his property.

The home originally cost $2,500 and was designed by Bessie Smith, Greeley’s first female architect.

The family raised farm animals and grew alfalfa, sugar beets, seed potatoes and beans, and other vegetables on the farm.

In 1983, the descendants of Charles White donated 2.5 acres of the original tree claim to the City of Greeley for historical, cultural and museum use. Today, the property is used for community gardens, event rentals, and as a learning center.

Grow a Row Garden Project

Grow a Row is a volunteer-led garden project, benefiting the Weld Food Bank. Learn more about the effort and its volunteers at GreeleyMuseums.com/Grow-a-Row-Garden.

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White-Plumb Farm

Do you remember anything about July 6 in the year you were 13 years old?
In her oral history, part of the Greeley History Museum’s collection, Charlotte Beeten recalls what she saw near her home in Johnstown on that day in 1924, when she was 13 years old :

“The meteorite fell on July 6, 1924, and I shall never forget that day. My sister had been visiting us from California and she was leaving for home that day. My father and I were putting her suitcases in the back of the car. We were out in the yard doing that. All of a sudden we heard this horrible, horrible roar and we looked up and saw this big ball of fire coming from the southwest. It looked as if it was going to land right in our front yard. My father said, “Run into the house!” By that time my mother and sister were running out of the house to see what was happening. So I never did get into the house. It finally landed right across the road from Village [?] Chapel and, of course, we saw the landing and we saw the smoke still coming from it. My father was the first one on the scene. When it was cooled and the smoke had subsided, he held the meteorite out of its resting place. […] It embedded itself about two feet into the ground.”

The 20-pound meteorite was given to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and its story has lived on in newspapers as recently as 2000. On July 6, whatever you’re doing, watch the sky - you never know what a day will bring!

Please note : Personal stories are a really important way of saving history. If you’re interested in helping us transcribe oral histories like this one, please call 970-350-9220.
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